Tag Archives: violence

Oppenheimer, Joshua; Anonymous (dirs). The Act of Killing


A documentary which challenges former Indonesian death-squad leaders to reenact their mass-killings in whichever cinematic genres they wish, including classic Hollywood crime scenarios and lavish musical numbers.


By director Joshua Oppenheimer

The Act of Killing reveals why violence we hope would be unimaginable is not only imagined, but also routinely performed. It is an effort to understand the moral vacuum that makes it possible for perpetrators of genocide to be celebrated on public television with cheers and smiles. It is a call to reexamine easy reassurances that we are the good guys fighting the bad guys, just because we say so.

Some viewers may desire resolution by the end of the film, a successful struggle for justice that results in changes in the balance of power, human rights tribunals, reparations, and official apologies. The film alone cannot create these changes, but this desire has been our inspiration as well, as we seek to shed light on the darkest chapters of both the local and global human story, and to express the real costs of blindness, expedience, and an inability to control greed and the hunger for power in an increasingly unified world society. This is not a story about Indonesia. This is a story about us all.

Directed: Joshua Oppenheimer
Produced:  Signe Byrge Sørensen
Cinematography: Anonymous, Carlos Arango de Montis, Lars Skree
Production company: Final Cut for Real, DK
Year: 2013


Peirce, Kimberly (dir). Boys Don’t Cry


In Falls City, Nebraska, Brandon Teena arrives to start a new future for himself. The local community falls for his charms and everyone becomes drawn to his innocence and wit. However, behind the charming persona is a totally different person – Brandon is actually a woman. After falling for a local karaoke singer, Brandon moves in with her family and wins them over. But when Brandon’s secret is finally out, the rest of the family all turn against him, branding him sick and evil.

Directed: Kimberly Peirce
Written: Andy Bienen, Kimberly Peirce
Year: 1999







Ramis, Harold (dir). Analyze This


Ben Sobol, Psychiatrist, has a few problems: His son spies on his patients when they open up their heart, his parents don’t want to attend his upcoming wedding and his patients’ problems don’t challenge him at all. Paul Vitti, Godfather, has a few problems as well: Sudden anxiety attacks in public, a certain disability to kill people and his best part ceasing service when needed. One day, Ben unfortunately crashes into one of Vitti’s cars. The exchange of Ben’s business card is followed by a business visit of Don Paul Vitti himself, who wants to be free of inner conflict within two weeks, before all the Mafia Dons meet.

Producers: Paula Weinstein, Jane Rosenthal
Year: 1999
Director: Harold Ramis
Writer: Kenneth Lonergan, Peter Tolan, Harold Ramis

Walker, A. The Color Purple

Set in the deep American south between the wars, this is the classic tale of Celie, a young poor black girl. Raped repeatedly by her father, she loses two children and then is married off to a man who treats her no better than a slave. She is separated from her sister Nettie and dreams of becoming like the glamorous Shug Avery, a singer and rebellious black woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually Celie discovers the support of women that enables her to leave the past behind and begin a new life. 

Author: Walker, Alice
Title: The Color Purple
Publisher: Phoenix
Year: 2004
ISBN: 0753818922

DVDs available on loan


Jamison, Kay Redfield. An Unquiet Mind

This work is a personal testimony from Kay Redfield Jamison: the revelation of her struggle with manic depression since adolescence, and how it has shaped her life. The book follows her through college, a love affair, her battle with the illness, bouts of madness, violence and attempted suicide.

Year: 1997
ISBN-10: 0330346512